Far from Home (Street Child): The sisters of Street Child

SKU: 943
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I am overwhelmed by the urge to tell everyone what happened, to share the gory details of a life they can’t imagine. I was a little skeptical when I first started the book, and after reading the first chapter I was about to give up, but since it was for a book club I kept reading, and I'm so glad I did! In Rosie’s memoir, she describes movingly how she has found the strength to come to terms with devastating loss, drawing on inspiration from her daughter’s short life.

I've been a fan of Berlie Doherty since I was an eight year old first reading Children of Winter, a spellbinding tale of a group of siblings during an outbreak of the plague. A valuable reminder of the invisible hurdles set in front of every young African American—an important story, extremely well told, that should serve as a lesson on how we got here and where we need to go.

Pansexual Taylor is a gamer, a little bit punk, White like Cass, and so, so great—but she still can’t help comparing her to Rowan, Cass’ online best friend and role-playing ship partner. The book was interesting as it was based in the Victorians and parts of the book were based on facts.

The characters are brilliantly written, and it is simply awesome to see two female protagonists take centre stage. A vey refreshing statement filled with things I love to hear, other than rhetorical questions of course.A few of the guys around me manage to fall asleep, even as the van bobs and weaves along the rutted highway. In a captivating tale about two teenage girls divided by decades and racial prejudice, Na'ima B Robert weaves an absorbing story about how the fight for land has shaped Zimbabwe's colonial legacy. If Blincoe’s accounts are true, and there’s no reason to believe that they aren’t, then many workers, particularly women and children, were treated as slaves, fettered to the mill-owner for years and with no hope of release or betterment.

Norris Kaplan, the protagonist of Philippe’s debut novel, is a hypersweaty, uber-snarky black, Haitian, French-Canadian pushing to survive life in his new school. Katie's story begins in 2000, she is a 14-year-old privileged, care-free farm girl with a doting father and a love of their sprawling Masvingo farm, which has a giant baobab at its centre.This is not exactly Rikers Island, but make no mistake—the tone and tenor of this facility shares little with my time reading a newspaper at the comparatively genteel Twentieth Precinct.

 

EAN: far from home book

 

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